Planet Impressions. Encourage. Inkblots in Rainbow Colors. Doing community in the global south and other places. "Higher up and further in!" with an outreach twist.

Posts tagged “seeking God

A love line to God this morning..

God,

I wish

my pen

were the tongue

of a skilful

orator

to applaud

Your

truth,

humility,

righteousness.

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Christmas Day 2013 in the Village

THE TUTUMA FULL OF MOQOCHINCHE (the traditional gourd village bowl full of spiced juice made of dried whole rural highland peaches) THAT DOÑA ABUELITA PASSED TO US.IMG_1759Gathered for breakfast at that same wooden round table Christmas morning we discussed a bit of Dallas Willard, where, in particular in his “The Spirit of the Disciplines” book he waxes eloquent in communicating his passionate belief that modern-day dichotomization of life into “spiritual” versus “nonspiritual” categories, is DAMAGING to persons and to the church, and that the practice of basic “spiritual disciplines” such as prayer, Bible reading, silence, solitude and SERVICE, among others, can be extremely helpful to the Christian. Just then, ancient Doña abuelita’s cane was heard tap-tapping slowly on the cement walkway just outside the village house and her grizzled head, topped by the ubiquitous misshapen felt bowler hat appeared outside the screened window.  One of our group quickly went out to speak in Quechua – her only language – with her and returned to announce, “Doña abuelita needs 80 adobes moved, so, how about it, boys?” Seeing as the “boys” in question were our four sturdy and kind-hearted HUSBANDS, all in their fifties! – it touched my heart to see how our “boys” immediately mobilized themselves to rush out there on Christmas morning and practice a bit of what we’d just been “preaching” to ourselves over breakfast – service to widows (of which Doña IS one – an 85-year-old widow, in fact, whose only home and extremely scant possession was a tiny adobe block two-room hovel and bare mud courtyard just outside the house of our friends). Three hours later (!) our “boys” reappeared in the kitchen, sunburned, covered in bee stings and red dirt, panting and exhausted, and with a couple of three-inch cactus thorns having pierced their shoes.  Adobes are HUGE!  Each one weighs at least 25  pounds!  Doña was content, even happy, and our “boys” were FULFILLED with the activities of their very unusual Christmas morning! Later we heard that it was all over the village that the gringos had moved adobes for old Doña abuelita.


How we sometimes traveled to reach the very rural Quechuas deep in the highlands where there were no roads.

These are some of the Bible school students we helped teach and work with, leaving from Potosi for a practicum journey with us deep into the Potosi mountains where totally isolated villagers lived in small, separated enclaves of 4 and 5 houses each, and there were no roads. After the last train station, the hike was another 8 to 10 hours on foot to get to the first community and on to others from there.


A love line to God this morning..

img_2769God,

I wish

my pen

were the tongue

of a skilful

orator

to applaud

Your

truth,

humility,

righteousness.


Philippians 4:8 in the KJV

“Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report, if there be any virtue and if there by any praise, think on these things.”IMG_2129


Christmas Day 2013 in the Village

THE TUTUMA FULL OF MOQOCHINCHE (the traditional gourd village bowl full of spiced juice made of dried whole rural highland peaches) THAT DOÑA ABUELITA PASSED TO US.IMG_1759Gathered for breakfast at that same wooden round table Christmas morning we discussed a bit of Dallas Willard, where, in particular in his “The Spirit of the Disciplines” book he waxes eloquent in communicating his passionate belief that modern-day dichotomization of life into “spiritual” versus “nonspiritual” categories, is DAMAGING to persons and to the church, and that the practice of basic “spiritual disciplines” such as prayer, Bible reading, silence, solitude and SERVICE, among others, can be extremely helpful to the Christian. Just then, ancient Doña abuelita’s cane was heard tap-tapping slowly on the cement walkway just outside the village house and her grizzled head, topped by the ubiquitous misshapen felt bowler hat appeared outside the screened window.  One of our group quickly went out to speak in Quechua – her only language – with her and returned to announce, “Doña abuelita needs 80 adobes moved, so, how about it, boys?” Seeing as the “boys” in question were our four sturdy and kind-hearted HUSBANDS, all in their fifties! – it touched my heart to see how our “boys” immediately mobilized themselves to rush out there on Christmas morning and practice a bit of what we’d just been “preaching” to ourselves over breakfast – service to widows (of which Doña IS one – an 85-year-old widow, in fact, whose only home and extremely scant possession was a tiny adobe block two-room hovel and bare mud courtyard just outside the house of our friends). Three hours later (!) our “boys” reappeared in the kitchen, sunburned, covered in bee stings and red dirt, panting and exhausted, and with a couple of three-inch cactus thorns having pierced their shoes.  Adobes are HUGE!  Each one weighs at least 25  pounds!  Doña was content, even happy, and our “boys” were FULFILLED with the activities of their very unusual Christmas morning! Later we heard that it was all over the village that the gringos had moved adobes for old Doña abuelita.


Prayer for my day

God,

Good morning.  Thank you for your presence with me and in me, through your Holy Spirit. Thank you that you promise your children your mercies fresh and new for each of them every morning.  Thanks for your faithfulness to us, the children of men, and  for the fact that you are good, and for the fact that you never change. Thank you also that you are love.  Lord, there are so many needs around us all, millions of needs.  Some of the needs and hurts are more visible and others are of the heart, hidden, but not hidden to you.  People need you, Lord.  You’ve chosen us to be your hands and feet, to be your light in darkness, your salt to lend savor and healing to your planet, earth, and to the hurting children of men.  Help us, your children, your chosen ones who know you, to walk closely with you this day being good salt, being good light.  Amen.IMG_6839


A love line to God this morning..

God,

I wish

my pen

were the tongue

of a skilful

orator

to applaud

Your

truth,

humility,

righteousness.


Christmas Day 2013 in the Village

THE TUTUMA FULL OF MOQOCHINCHE (the traditional gourd village bowl full of spiced juice made of dried whole rural highland peaches) THAT DOÑA ABUELITA PASSED TO US.IMG_1759Gathered for breakfast at that same wooden round table Christmas morning we discussed a bit of Dallas Willard, where, in particular in his “The Spirit of the Disciplines” book he waxes eloquent in communicating his passionate belief that modern-day dichotomization of life into “spiritual” versus “nonspiritual” categories, is DAMAGING to persons and to the church, and that the practice of basic “spiritual disciplines” such as prayer, Bible reading, silence, solitude and SERVICE, among others, can be extremely helpful to the Christian.

Just then, ancient Doña abuelita’s cane was heard tap-tapping slowly on the cement walkway just outside the village house and her ancient, grizzled head, topped by the ubiquitos black dusty misshapen felt bowler hat appeared outside the screened window.  One of our group quickly went out to speak in Quechua – her only language – with her and returned to announce, “Doña abuelita needs 80 adobes moved, so, how about it, boys?”

Seeing as the “boys” in question were our four sturdy and kind-hearted HUSBANDS, all in their fifties! – it touched my heart to see how our “boys” immediately mobilized themselves to rush out there on Christmas morning and practice a bit of what we’d just been “preaching” to ourselves over breakfast – service to widows (of which Doña IS one – an 85-year-old widow, in fact, whose only home and extremely scant possession was a tiny adobe block two-room hovel and bare mud courtyard just outside the house of our friends).

Three hours later (!) our “boys” reappeared in the kitchen, sunburned, covered in bee stings and red dirt, panting and exhausted, and with a couple of three-inch cactus thorns having pierced their shoes.  Adobes are HUGE!  Each one weighs at least 25  pounds!  Doña was content, even happy, and our “boys” were FULFILLED with the activities of their very unusual Christmas morning! Later we heard that it was all over the village that the gringos had moved adobes for old Doña abuelita.


A love line to God this morning..

God,

I wish

my pen

were the tongue

of a skilful

orator

to applaud

Your

truth,

humility,

righteousness.