What is a faun? Higher up and further in with an outreach twist. Writing.

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Look what God’s done for us today. (Deuteronomy 30)

“This commandment that I’m commanding you today isn’t too much for you, it’s not out of your reach…Look at what I’ve done for you today: I’ve placed in front of you Life and Good, Death and Evil, and I command you today:  Love God, your God.  Walk in his ways.  Keep his commandments, regulations, and rules so that you will live, really live, live exuberantly, blessed by God, your God, in the land you are about to enter and possess…  Choose life so that you and your children will live.  And love God, your God, listening obediently to him, firmly embracing him.  Oh yes, he is life itself.” (in The Message. Deuteronomy 30.)


Vignette # 7 from the Children

#7 Amanda, 5 years old, kept complaining to the adult monitor that some of the little boys kept calling her a SPIDER (araña)!  They kept insisting that they were not!  (a lot of these little ones seem to have lisps and slight speech impediments)  Several of the other kids chimed right in and they all had a little philosophical discussion about it.

 

 

 


M.C.M. Bearing Fruit

img_5903– Guest Post by P.B.

“Feliciano Rios lives with his wife and five children in Chillavi, a small Andean town located in the high mountains to the north of Cochabamba.  Like almost all of the residents of Chillavi and the surrounding villages, Feliciano and his family live off subsistence agriculture, farming small parcels of land.  They also have small herds of sheep and llamas.

Feliciano has been a believer for 24 years, since before he was married.  Feliciano didn’t grow up in church, nor in a Christian family.  He has never been to a Bible school or seminary of any type.  However, for the past four years Feliciano has been the itinerant leader of 19 little churches spread out through the mountains around Chillave.  How does he do it?  Where did he learn the Word of God?

As Feliciano will tell you, “M.C.M. short-wave radio has taught me the Bible.  The programs encourage me, teach me how to educate my children, how to be a good husband and father, how to resolve the challenges that come up in a family.  The Radio has shown me how to grow and mature.  While I listen to the programs, I take notes in order to share with others in the 19 churches I help.  M.C.M. has been my teacher.”

Feliciano has listened to M.C.M. radio since we started broadcasting almost 15 years ago.  It is great to hear of the Radio’s impact on his life, and the manner in which that has gone on to impact the lives of so many others.”


Food Containers

We have these wonderful food containers in Bolivia that have a long rich history of their own. Since the food culture of the country isn’t particularly “cold light luncheon” or “sandwich” oriented – a hot meal is thought to be the “real food” of the day –  these traditional food containers are designed, in part, for hot soups, stews, cooked meat, and warm sides, though they also contain enough separate compartments for dessert and cool salad!

Environmentally, they’re wonderful!  You re-use them for a lifetime, every day, and you even pass them down to your grandchildren! What a concept!

One goes to a noon-time dinner place (a “pension” and, as one sits at the table waiting for one’s three to four-course hot meal to arrive – all for the equivalent, in pricing, of maybe three or four dollars!) one sees at least 5 to 6 people, often children, step into the pension, hand over to the clerk one of these multi-compartment food containers, and wait placidly for ten minutes, while the container gets filled for them, in the back kitchen, out of sight. The clerk comes back, carefully hands it over, now heavy with fragrant, steaming, home-cooked food, the child pays (or gets the meal written down on the running ticket and off goes the kid, this in hand. And, it’s a family thing, not individual. The food compartments are big enough to hold dinner for a family of six. Family dinner together (but over the noon hour, as it used to be in our grandparents’ heyday) is still a huge value in Bolivia.IMG_6447


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One of multitudinous very great happinesses – snapping photos!

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Vignette # 7 from the Children

#7 Amanda, 5 years old, kept complaining to the adult monitor that some of the little boys kept calling her a SPIDER (araña)!  They kept insisting that they were not!  (a lot of these little ones seem to have lisps and slight speech impediments)  Several of the other kids chimed right in and they all had a little philosophical discussion about it.

 

 

 


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“The Laundry Room” the Hostal Colonial, Sucre, Bolivia

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A funny experience near the Miami airport a few days ago.

We were riding in an airport shuttle van, and we were the only passengers in the van at the moment.  Our van driver, who was an Hispanic young man from either some country in Central America or possibly from the nation of Columbia, asked us where we were going.

When we replied, “We are going to Guatemala” he said, “oh, so, you are going to Guatemala – “Agua Mala”.”  I was surprised, and we all laughed together!

We’ve been careful of our drinking water, of the cups and glasses we’re drinking out of, about hand washing, and about spitting well after every single teeth-brushing.  So far we are doing okay!

The beauty of these people and this country FAR outweigh, for me, any small risk we are running of catching a tummy bug for a few days and, besides, we have not caught any sicknesses in Guatemala!

I just thought the Central American young man’s joke was funny, and decided to share it on the blog.